Eagle Rock Music Fest Celebrates 15 Years With Culture-clash Lineup

Ahmet Ertegun, the Man Who Made Bieber, and Other Crazy Stories From the Music Business

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Cyrus was not by any means the sole offender. Most glaringly, as The Huffington Post’s Danielle Cadet pointed out last month , not a single award winner was black. Not one. I was also hard-pressed to find LGBTQ artists on my screen. The combination of this apparent homogeneity with a straight, white artist like Macklemore winning a Moon Man for a song about same-sex marriage left me feeling uncomfortable at best. His dominating presence at the award show and in the mainstream music industry calls for another conversation about diverse identities within the music world. The issue is not that he performs a song about the queer equality movement. His video for “Same Love” was the obvious winner for “Video With a Message” given its popularity, viral outreach, and content. Support is support, and I don’t really feel the need to cut him down for using his fame to advocate for an important cause. Celebrities do that all the time. Sure, Macklemore and his producer Ryan Lewis made a pretty penny from the song’s success, but I’m willing to take the popularity as an indication of America’s shifting viewpoint on sexuality and not as a slimy moneymaking move on the part of the artist. Plus, Mary Lambert, who is featured on the track, is an out lesbian who writes about the social issues that affect her as a queer woman all the time. She’s not the one getting the credit, though, which brings me to my next point.

Iconic rock guitars and their owners

Mayer had had in theirs. By 1971, Ahmet Ertegun (jaunty, well dressed, bald, forty-seven years old, and of very recent Turkish extraction) was the Greatest Rock-and-Roll Mogul in the World, and the men in the businesspromoters, producers, corporate functionaries, managers, P.R. peoplewho were often cynical about the eminence of performers, were fascinated and sometimes moved by the eminence they saw in him. Ben Paynter Businessweek November 2012 How a loathsome band makes gobs of money. In addition to masterminding Nickelbacks ascent, Kroeger, 37, has found ways for his band to make money onstage and off, through licensing, merchandising, and product-placement agreements. Hes also helped groom many other acts, including some that the haters might even like. He co-owns the record company that released Carly Rae Jepsens ubiquitous summer smash, Call Me Maybe. He co-writes songs for other major artists and helps to promote them. As of May 2011, the rock-star-cum-business-mogul was earning $9.7 million a year from his various ventures, according to court records filed with the Supreme Court of British Columbia. He has a vacation home with friends in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, a 20-acre farm with stables in British Columbia, and his own home recording studio. Chad Kroeger is not just a drunken rock god: Hes a kingmaker. TUESDAY, APRIL 20, 2010, AT 6:19 PM Tornado Kills at Least Five in Oklahoma FRIDAY, APRIL 29, 2011, AT 3:07 PM Obama Gets Firsthand Look at a Tornado Damage TUESDAY, APRIL 20, 2010, AT 6:19 PM Tornado Kills at Least Five in Oklahoma.

With the boulder bearing the image of an eagle in flight lording over it, the annual Eagle Rock Music Festival celebrates 15 years on Saturday by taking over the neighborhood’s business district. Featuring multiple stages, the day-long party will echo through the hills of Northeast Los Angeles with experimental electronic and ambient music, Americana, rock, global bass, jazz, blues and punk, as well as food and family-centered action. It’s an impressive and adventurous roster, featuring artists Bosnian Rainbows, Poolside, Boardwalk, Nguzunguzu, Dub Club and a few dozen others, and presents evidence of the vibrant music community that has blossomed in the area. Over the span of the festival’s life, Eagle Rock and its sister neighborhoods Highland Park and Atwater Village have become independent music havens, home to labels including Friends of Friends, Innovative Leisure, Stones Throw, Now-Again, Alpha Pup, Brainfeeder and others. Studios and indie biz offices dot corners, and no fewer than four fantastic record stores sell choice, expertly curated music. RELATED: The 10 Commandments of smartphone use during concerts Perhaps most important for the area’s long-term prospects, the proceeds from the festival will help fund the Center for the Arts, Eagle Rock, a nonprofit space near the corner of Eagle Rock and Colorado that programs art camps, after-school classes, workshops — one on the xylophone begins on Oct. 14 (!) — and concerts. Its mission is to ensure that the area remains an arts hub for generations to come. The space has long been utilized by taste-making promoters FYF for innovative gigs and represents the area’s dominant population with evenings of Latin American-focused music. Friday night, for example, the center will host the monthly “Noches de Trova,” which features Mexican and Latin American singer-songwriters drawing on bolero, ranchera, country, jazz, folk and blues music. Saturday’s music festival roster is all over the place. Those looking for heavy rhythm should note Nguzunguzu, whose tracks are typified by tribal, polyglot beats and psychedelic washes of synthetics. The smoother-grooved duo Poolside celebrates the more casual aspects of dance music, a team “inspired by California, mezcal, dancing, good food and friends.” The beguiling duo Boardwalk, which has an excellent new album out on Stones Throw, promises to be a highlight. INTERACTIVE: A festival for every fan SoCal’s yearly sonic lineup The biggest influx of fans will no doubt arrive for Bosnian Rainbows, though.

Music: Electronic DJ-produced Zedd blitzes pop world

HS Football on the go HS Football on the go Get up to the minute high school football coverage on your phone or tablet all season long at HSLIVE.me HS Football on the Web HS Football on the Web Get 24/7 high school football coverage on your desktop or laptop all season long at GameDayExtra.com Music: Electronic DJ-produced Zedd blitzes pop world Anton Zaslavski, aka Zedd, is one of the hottest young DJs and producers in music. Posted: Sunday, October 6, 2013 12:00 am Music: Electronic DJ-produced Zedd blitzes pop world Associated Press | NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Anton Zaslavski, the DJ and producer known as Zedd, is sitting in a temporary recording studio at the back of his bus on a recent tour stop, but he hasn’t had time to turn the computer on or slip on the headphones. One of the hottest young DJs and producers in music, the baby-faced 24-year-old’s to-do list is so long there are things on it he may never get to. He’s got two songs on the charts, the deluxe edition of his debut album “Clarity” was released last week, he’s finishing music for Lady Gaga’s forthcoming album “ARTPOP” and there are new projects pitched to him every week that he fields from his bus-studio. “It’s the best studio on a bus I’ve seen so far,” Zaslavski said. “I can’t afford not to be working on music for that long. … I just don’t want to not be able to finish something.” Classically trained as a child and rock ‘n’ roll obsessed as a teen, the German-born Zedd turned to electronic music only recently. But already it’s gotten to the point where he will soon have to say no. Is there any such thing as too busy in the grab-it-now pop music world?