Concert Ballet Offers Deft Intro To Nijinsky’s Challenging Work

Keith Sweat concert cancelled due to safety issues

Armed Islamist militants raided the Westgate mall, killing at least 67 people and injuring others. The death toll is expected to rise. The shoppers were held hostage for four days before the situation was under control. Sweat was scheduled to perform Oct. 5 at the Carnivore grounds in Nairobi. “We sincerely apologize for the inconvenience caused by the unexpected news. This is especially to all Keith Sweat fans and everyone who supported us. We are all shaken by the events of the past weekend and we deemed it best to postpone the concert as the country mourns,” spokesperson Martin Mulwa said. Nina Ogot, an Afro-fusion singer, was also scheduled to open Sweat’s concert. She spoke to The Star about her excitement for the show before it was cancelled. “Wow!

PPO opening concert Saturday

Cost: $18-$20 Tickets: concertballetofvirginia@yahoo.com or call (804) 798-0945 Posted: Sunday, September 29, 2013 12:00 am Concert Ballet offers deft intro to Nijinskys challenging work BY SHEENA JEFFERS Special correspondent Richmond Times-Dispatch It was an evening of contrasts for The Concert Ballet of Virginia opening the show with elegant dresses and fluttering choreography, and closing out the night with the haunting, striking moves of Vaslav Nijinskys Le Sacre du Printemps (The Rite of Spring). The show, while lacking in showcasing perfected ballet technique, does leave the audience with a feeling of having experienced a range of emotions from light and happy to weird and disturbed. Watkins Jr., presented a varied show for its annual Fall Repertory Gala at The Womans Club. Degas, choreographed by Karen Moore to music by Charles Gounod, was visually pleasant with lighthearted choreography that played with canon and rhythm. The processional of ballerinas felt cramped on a small stage, which accentuated broken lines of the body, but the choreography was intelligently intermingled with the music. Engulfed Cathedral, choreographed by Carolyn Pillow Mayhew and set to music by Claude Debussy, abruptly shifted the tone of the evening. The decor by deVeaux Riddick captured the audiences attention with its staccato ripples. The sharp background movement contrasted with the stillness of the dancers was arresting; however, it was difficult to turn your attention from the decor to focus on the dancing, which featured Jeannine Halphen on pointe performing with Scott Boyer. Expectations were high with only two dancers in the piece but, with its unimpressive pointe work and bland partnering, it didnt live up to its strong introduction. Lemonade, choreographed by Susan Eason and set to music by Louis Moreau Gottschalk, was the treat of the evening. Bright-colored dresses and umbrellas that popped open and closed while moving in and out of visually intriguing formations could not help but make the audience smile, especially following the confusing Engulfed Cathedral. Riddicks scenery complemented the piece delightfully. The translucent drop allowed for separation of the dancers being featured on stage while presenting a glimpse of dancers tiptoeing to the other side.

Concert preview: Indigo Girls still flourishing

Interestingly, they never write together and there was never anything resembling a master plan. aNo, weare not really so good at that kind of stuff,a Ray says. aI donat think anybody can really know how things are going to work in the business. Really, we didnat have huge ambitions; we were a one-day-at-a-time band, always. aThatas the way you are when youare in high school when you start. You have small goals. You want to play at some sandwich shop next week and then some bandas coming to town that you idolize and your dream is to open for them. Those kinds of things. aThatas the great thing about starting when youare that young. Itas so organic.a Lately the two have settled into a regular, hard-working-duo-style career. Their current Two North Canadian tour is something theyave always wanted to do a just the two of them and the tour manager, no band. Driving a van from Victoria and Vancouver through Kelowna, Edmonton, Winnipeg, through Ontario and out to Halifax should be an excellent Canadian baptism by fire. Occasionally ice.

Saturday, Oct. 5, in Memorial Hall, located at 83 Court St. Enjoy pre-concert refreshments and hors doeuvres beginning at 6 p.m. in nearby Pilgrim Hall Museum, located at 75 Court St. Reception tickets are $20 and may be purchased by calling 508-746-8008. Tickets for the concert range from $20 to $65. Call 508-746-8008 or visit www.plymouthphil.org for more information. The Plymouth Philharmonic Orchestras Celebrating 20 opening night concert will be at 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5, in Memorial Hall, located at 83 Court St. Enjoy pre-concert refreshments and hors doeuvres beginning at 6 p.m. in nearby Pilgrim Hall Museum, located at 75 Court St. Reception tickets are $20 and may be purchased by calling 508-746-8008. Tickets for the concert range from $20 to $65. Call 508-746-8008 or visit www.plymouthphil.org for more information.